Humanitarian racism and “pet exceptionalism”

As the final part of a three-part series, this blog reflects on the “open-door policy” for Ukrainian pets following the Russian invasion of Ukraine and how this “pet exceptionalism” challenges us to rethink humanitarian work and protection.

Ukrainian companion animals: Unsettling humanitarian borders

As part two of a three-part series, this blog considers the cross-border mobility of Ukrainian companion animals and explores the (re)bordering effects and (re)production of state-based citizenship generated by the reception of companion animals.

Ukrainian refugees and pet exceptionalism

When the war in Ukraine started in early 2022, the protection of pets soon became part of the humanitarian narrative. As part one of a three-part series, this blog explores ethical, practical and policy-related questions regarding Ukrainian refugee pet exceptionalism and the need for a critical discussion on the topic.

Change of culture? Gender and Intergovernmental Organisations

Gender equality, standing for equal treatment and opportunities between genders, has become a liberal norm central to many intergovernmental organisations, including the United Nations (UN). This blog explores the duality of gender equality as a normative aim of the UN’s external interventions, as well as an internal organisational goal.

Regulatory conundrum: Exclusive tourism enclaves

Mega tourism projects have the potential to transform or disfigure local communities. This blog explores the regulatory and possible humanitarian challenges associated with exclusive tourism enclaves.

When are economic sanctions morally justified?

In spite of widespread support for the sanctions against Russia after the invasion of Ukraine, international economic sanctions remain a controversial instrument in world politics. This blog discusses how the ethical criteria of just cause, proportionality, last resort and reasonable chance of success can help us think about the justice of sanctions.

How do IDPs and refugees fit within traditional, indigenous, and local knowledge of disasters?

As part three in a feature series on the environment-displacement nexus, this blog examines how refugees and IDPs interact with the natural environment and hazard risks in their newly settled areas.

Uneven displacement

As part two in a feature series on the environment-displacement nexus, this blog takes a closer look a village in coastal Guinea-Bissau where rising sea levels and tidal flooding have gradually displaced villagers.

Environmental justice for refugees in host countries

A part one in a feature series on the environment-displacement nexus, this blog examines how Syrian refugees are disproportionately harmed by air and water pollution in Lebanon.

A perfect storm? The impact of the Ukraine war on donor priorities

Two seemingly unrelated global events in September – the devastating floods in Pakistan and the Russian closure of the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline – intersect on the issue of funding for humanitarian relief. This blog examines the impact of the Ukraine war on donor priorities.

Islamic philanthropy and Islamic social finance in humanitarian action

This blog explores the opportunities and challenges associated with Muslim philanthropy and Islamic social finance as a source of humanitarian financing.

Pets and humanitarian borders

Currently little academic attention is paid to pets and war. This blog explores how the care for animals is rapidly becoming a part of the humanitarian narrative of the attack on Ukraine and provides a starting point for further discussion on this topic.

Submit your blog

Submit your blog

We welcome your contributions to the NCHS blog. Please review our blog guidelines below before submitting your blog using this form. While this blog is hosted by the NCHS, the views expressed by individual authors are their own and must not be interpreted as the position of the NCHS.

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Blog guidelines

Who can contribute

We welcome blog contributions from across the humanitarian field, whether you are a researcher, academic, practitioner or postgraduate student.

For example, you may be a researcher wishing to link your studies to current affairs or events, or you may be a research student wanting to share some preliminary research findings. We also welcome contributions from practitioners working in the field wishing to share experiences or reflections on humanitarian issues or practices.

How to contribute

Please use the form above to submit your blog. It is useful if you also tell us how your blog contributes to the analysis or discussion about a particular humanitarian topic or issue.

All submissions should be made electronically and in Microsoft Word (not PDF or any other format). Blog posts should ideally be between 800 and 1,500 words in length. Please do not submit blogs more than 2,000 words.

Please include the names and a short bio for each author (no more than two to three sentences per author). If you use social media, you can also include your Twitter and/or Facebook handles. Also include a title for the blog, as well as an abstract or summary (maximum 100 words).

It is also useful if you include a suitable accompanying photo or image for your blog. Please also provide a caption where possible and ensure you cite the source and have permission to use it.

Blogs are best when they are easily understood by a wide audience. Please write in an accessible way that will be easily understood. Adding hyperlinks to relevant sources and background information is also a useful way to provide the reader with more information or provide further explanation of complex concepts. Add a short list of references at the end of your blog if necessary.

Please let us know if your blog has been published elsewhere. We can in some cases consider posting pieces that have previously been published, however, the author then needs to obtain permission from the original publisher to re-publish the work.

As a contributor, you are responsible for the factual accuracy of your work. You are also responsible for correctly citing other sources. Responsibility for any plagiarism rests with the author.

Blog review process

Please be aware that all blogs submitted for publication undergo an independent and anonymous review process. The reviewer may make suggestions to revise your blog prior to publication.

While this blog is hosted by the NCHS, the views expressed by individual authors are their own and must not be interpreted as the position of the NCHS.