Afghanistan’s corona threat contagion knows no borders

During March 2020, 145,000 Afghans returned from Iran, many infected with coronavirus. This blog examines the impact of Covid-19 on Afghanistan.

The Covid-19 resettlement freeze

The Covid-19 pandemic has triggered the suspension of international resettlement for refugees. This blog examines the discretionary nature of resettlement and the possible future impacts of the resettlement suspension.

The “real” transformation of migrant smuggling in the time of Covid-19

As Covid-19 continues to spread around the world, allegations of migrant smuggling networks evolving, changing, and undergoing drastic transformations as a result of the pandemic are starting to emerge.

The end of protection?

With increasing enthusiasm, European states are reviving the Refugee Convention’s cessation provisions in service of their return-oriented refugee policies. This practice threatens the careful balance established by refugee law between the security of refugee status, on the one hand, and its impermanence on the other.

Genealogies of humanitarian containment in the Middle East

In 2015, more than one million migrants reached Europe in the largest movement of people since WWII. In order to seize control of “irregular migration,” the EU and Schengen countries instituted a new policy of regional containment that targeted migrants arriving via major land and sea routes.

The Cartagena Declaration at 35 and refugee protection in Latin America

On November 22nd 2019 the Cartagena Declaration on Refugees (Cartagena Declaration) turns 35. It is a paramount document on refugees’ protection in Latin America, setting both normative standards and the regional tone for policies and actions in this area, thus, being a cornerstone of Refugee Law in the region.

The weaponisation of killer trucks

On October 23, 2019, 39 bodies were found inside a refrigerator lorry on an industrial estate in Essex. The vehicle was registered in Varna, Bulgaria, had entered the UK four days before and was driven by a man from Northern-Ireland. The victims – 38 adults and a teenager – were identified as Vietnamese. This incident is just the latest example of vehicle-induced migrant mass fatalities.

R.I.P. Europe

Thousands of people have died in the Mediterranean Sea in the past few years in an attempt to reach Europe. What happened two days ago was only the most recent episode in this human-made, ongoing catastrophe.

Preventing the work of rescue vessels in the Mediterranean will not save more migrants

The Norwegian-registered vessel Ocean Viking, operated by Médecins Sans Frontières, has recently been at the centre of a debate that has become dominated by one assumption: that search-and-rescue (SAR) operations are encouraging people to attempt to cross the Mediterranean.

Europe’s new border guards

More than a million migrants crossed the Mediterranean in an attempt to reach Europe during the 2015 refugee crisis, the vast majority arriving either in Greece or Italy. The following year the European Union entered the so-called “EU-Turkey Deal”, a statement of cooperation between European states and the Turkish government.

Penal humanitarianism: Projecting European penal power beyond Europe

Drawing on the case of Niger, this blog examines some of the processes through which the EU projects penal power beyond Europe and its allegedly humanitarian rationale.

Penal humanitarianism: Moral discomfort at the border

How do individuals tasked with carrying out state policies on border control react to direct encounters with human suffering, and what are the implications of such interpersonal encounters on border studies?

Submit your blog

Submit your blog

We welcome your contributions to the NCHS blog. Please review our blog guidelines below before submitting your blog using this form. While this blog is hosted by the NCHS, the views expressed by individual authors are their own and must not be interpreted as the position of the NCHS.

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Blog guidelines

Who can contribute

We welcome blog contributions from across the humanitarian field, whether you are a researcher, academic, practitioner or postgraduate student.

For example, you may be a researcher wishing to link your studies to current affairs or events, or you may be a research student wanting to share some preliminary research findings. We also welcome contributions from practitioners working in the field wishing to share experiences or reflections on humanitarian issues or practices.

How to contribute

Please use the form above to submit your blog. It is useful if you also tell us how your blog contributes to the analysis or discussion about a particular humanitarian topic or issue.

All submissions should be made electronically and in Microsoft Word (not PDF or any other format). Blog posts should ideally be between 800 and 1,500 words in length. Please do not submit blogs more than 2,000 words.

Please include the names and a short bio for each author (no more than two to three sentences per author). If you use social media, you can also include your Twitter and/or Facebook handles. Also include a title for the blog, as well as an abstract or summary (maximum 100 words).

It is also useful if you include a suitable accompanying photo or image for your blog. Please also provide a caption where possible and ensure you cite the source and have permission to use it.

Blogs are best when they are easily understood by a wide audience. Please write in an accessible way that will be easily understood. Adding hyperlinks to relevant sources and background information is also a useful way to provide the reader with more information or provide further explanation of complex concepts. Add a short list of references at the end of your blog if necessary.

Please let us know if your blog has been published elsewhere. We can in some cases consider posting pieces that have previously been published, however, the author then needs to obtain permission from the original publisher to re-publish the work.

As a contributor, you are responsible for the factual accuracy of your work. You are also responsible for correctly citing other sources. Responsibility for any plagiarism rests with the author.

Blog review process

Please be aware that all blogs submitted for publication undergo an independent and anonymous review process. The reviewer may make suggestions to revise your blog prior to publication.

While this blog is hosted by the NCHS, the views expressed by individual authors are their own and must not be interpreted as the position of the NCHS.